Cognitive modelling, self aware robots Tensorflow, & adversarial attacks

 

This week I’ve been learning about cognitive modelling, self aware robots,  adversarial attacks in reinforcement learning and starting to play with Tensorflow.

Cognitive Modelling

The latest MIT AGI video was released a few days ago. In this Nate Derbinsky gives an overview of different types of cognitive architectures, including SPAUN, ACT-R, Sigma and Soar (his baby). This reminds me of old school AI: symbolic processing. My supervisor’s PURR-PUSS would belong in this category. These are a lot less sexy than deep learning, but in many way’s they are complementary with applications in robotics, game playing & natural language processing.

 

TWiML podcasts

SUM cognitive architectureThis week I listened to an interesting podcast with Raja Chatila on robot perception and discovery. In this Raja talked about the necessity of robot self awareness for true intelligence and the ethics of intelligent autonomous systems. It’s interesting to see that the sort of architectures used for exploring artificial consciousness in robotics have a lot of overlap with the cognitive models described by Nate Derbinsky in the MIT AGI series.

I also had the chance to listen to Google Brainers Ian Goodfellow & Sandy Huang discussing adversarial attacks used against reinforcement learning  Adversarial attacks highlight some of the weakness of deep learning. When used for image classification the image is just a series of numbers that has a set of mathematical operations performed on it to produce a classification. By subtly changing some of the numbers you can fool the classifier, even though to a human the image looks exactly the same. The example of a Panda below was taken from a 2015 Google paper.

panda

In the podcast Ian and Sandy discuss how this can be used against a reinforcement learning agent that has been trained to play computer games. Even changing one pixel can significantly degrade the performance.

Tensorflow

I’m up to the part in my CS231n course where you start to train CNNs using Tensorflow or Pytorch. Despite reading a compelling argument for using Pytorch over Tensorflow on Quora, the people I’ve spoken to locally are using Tensorflow – so I’m going to go with that. I found this introduction useful.

I managed to get the software installed and run Hello World. Apparently there is more you can do with it…

Tensorflow hello world

 

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